A Skeleton With Labelshuman Skeleton Diagram With Labels Graphic

The human skeleton, an intricate internal framework, serves as the architectural basis for our bodies. Comprising numerous individual bones and cartilages, it provides structural support, protection, and facilitates movement. Let’s delve into the fascinating details of this remarkable system.

## Axial Skeleton: The Core Support

1. Vertebral Column (Spine):
– The vertebral column, akin to the notochord in lower organisms, forms the central axis of the axial skeleton. It consists of 33 vertebrae, grouped into five regions: cervical, thoracic, lumbar, sacral, and coccygeal.
– These vertebrae encase and protect the delicate spinal cord, allowing us to stand upright and maintain posture.
– Intervertebral discs cushion the vertebrae, absorbing shocks and enabling flexibility.

2. Skull:
– The skull houses the brain, sensory organs, and the intricate cranial nerves.
– It comprises 22 bones, including the cranium (protecting the brain) and facial bones (forming the eye sockets, nasal cavity, and jaw).
– The hyoid bone, part of the visceral subdivision, supports the tongue and aids in swallowing.

3. Thorax:
– The rib cage safeguards vital organs such as the heart and lungs.
– Twelve pairs of ribs articulate with the thoracic vertebrae, forming the rib cage.
– The sternum (breastbone) connects the ribs anteriorly.

## Appendicular Skeleton: Mobility and Functionality

1. Upper Limbs:
– The pectoral girdle (shoulder) consists of the clavicle (collarbone) and scapula (shoulder blade).
– The humerus, radius, and ulna form the arm and forearm.
– The carpals, metacarpals, and phalanges constitute the hand.

2. Lower Limbs:
– The pelvic girdle (hip) includes the ilium, ischium, and pubis bones.
– The femur, tibia, and fibula create the thigh and leg.
– The tarsals, metatarsals, and phalanges compose the foot.

3. Functions of the Skeleton:
– Support: The skeleton’s primary role is to provide a sturdy framework for the body.
– Protection: Bones shield delicate organs. For instance, the rib cage guards the heart and lungs.
– Motion: Joints between bones allow movement. Some joints, like the ball-and-socket joint in the hip, offer a wide range of motion.
– Hematopoiesis: Certain bones, such as the sternum and pelvis, produce blood cells.

In summary, the human skeleton, with its intricate interplay of bones, cartilage, ligaments, and tendons, is a marvel of design. It upholds our bodies, safeguards vital organs, and enables graceful movement—a silent architect shaping our existence..

A Skeleton With Labelshuman Skeleton Diagram With Labels Graphic Diagram - A Skeleton With Labelshuman Skeleton Diagram With Labels Graphic Chart - Human anatomy diagrams and charts explained. This anatomy system diagram depicts A Skeleton With Labelshuman Skeleton Diagram With Labels Graphic with parts and labels. Best diagram to help learn about health, human body and medicine.

A Skeleton With Labelshuman Skeleton Diagram With Labels Graphic

Human Brain Anatomy Graphic

Human Brain Anatomy

The human brain, a complex organ, is the central component of the nervous system. It controls thought, memory, emotion, touch, motor skills, vision, breathing, temperature, hunger, and every process that regulates our body.

Composition

Weighing about 3 pounds in the average adult, the brain is about 60% fat. The remaining 40% is a combination of water, protein, carbohydrates, and salts. The brain is primarily composed of nerve cells, also known as neurons, and supportive glial cells. It contains blood vessels and nerves, including neurons and glial cells.

Gray Matter and White Matter

Gray and white matter are two different regions of the central nervous system. In the brain, gray matter refers to the darker, outer portion, while white matter describes the lighter, inner section underneath. Gray matter is primarily composed of neuron somas (the round central cell bodies), and white matter is mostly made of axons (the long stems that connect neurons together) wrapped in myelin (a protective coating). Gray matter is primarily responsible for processing and interpreting information, while white matter transmits that information to other parts of the nervous system.

Main Parts of the Brain

The brain can be divided into the cerebrum, brainstem, and cerebellum.

1. Cerebrum: The cerebrum (front of the brain) comprises gray matter (the cerebral cortex) and white matter at its center. The largest part of the brain, the cerebrum initiates and coordinates movement and regulates temperature. Other areas of the cerebrum enable speech, judgment, thinking and reasoning, problem-solving, emotions, and learning. Other functions relate to vision, hearing, touch, and other senses.

2. Cerebral Cortex: The cortex has a large surface area due to its folds, and comprises about half of the brain’s weight. The cerebral cortex is divided into two halves, or hemispheres. It is covered with ridges (gyri) and folds (sulci).

3. Brainstem: The brainstem consists of the midbrain, the pons, and the medulla oblongata.

4. Cerebellum: The cerebellum is connected to the brainstem by three pairs of nerve tracts called cerebellar peduncles.

Functioning

The brain sends and receives chemical and electrical signals throughout the body. Different signals control different processes, and your brain interprets each. Some make you feel tired, for example, while others make you feel pain. Some messages are kept within the brain, while others are relayed through the spine and across the body’s vast network of nerves to distant extremities. To do this, the central nervous system relies on billions of neurons (nerve cells)..

Human Brain Anatomy Graphic Diagram - Human Brain Anatomy Graphic Chart - Human anatomy diagrams and charts explained. This anatomy system diagram depicts Human Brain Anatomy Graphic with parts and labels. Best diagram to help learn about health, human body and medicine.

Human Brain Anatomy Graphic